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techdirections January 2014 : Page 19

By Edward J. Lazaros ejlazaros@bsu.edu D ESKTOP publishing can be taught in the tech-nology classroom with a personal computer, page layout software like Adobe InDesign, and a color printer. Students can produce books, news-letters, pamphlets, business cards, postcards, and greeting cards with desktop publishing software. People working in the desktop publishing field generate illustra-tions and arrange those illustrations with text and images, making them attractive in terms of design. They use software to manipulate the size, fonts, and spacing of text. The digital files generated are typically output to a printing plate that can be used to reproduce the design in mass quan-tity. Short-run print jobs can also be output with a high resolution color printer. companies, a desktop publisher has responsibility for a wide variety of jobs. At a large firm, he or she may only perform a specific task like page layout (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2011). Desktop pub-Photo 1 (above) Photo 2 (left) Required Equipment and Software Computer with Internet access Adobe InDesign page layout software Printer In addition to designing the layout of the pages, it is not uncommon for a desktop publisher to write and edit content in the course of work on an article or newsletter. In small Edward J. Lazaros is director/ advisor of the Master of Arts in Career and Technical Education, Department of Technology, Ball State University, Muncie, IN. lishers are often referred to by differ-ent titles depending on the specific job that they are hired to complete. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (2011), “desktop publishers also may be called publication spe-cialists, electronic publishers, DTP operators, desktop publishing edi-tors, electronic prepress technicians, electronic publishing specialists, image designers, and Web publica-tion designers.” Of particular interest to students is the fact that there is generally no requirement for a specific type of education or training. However, the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests an associate or a bachelor’s degree in graphic arts, graphic communica-tion, or graphic design. A wide range of annual salaries may be attained in this occupation. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the “median annual wages of desktop publishers were $39,040 in May 2012. The middle 50% earned between $28,140 and $47,870. The lowest 10% earned less than $21,860, and the highest 10% earned more than $59,210 a year” (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2011). The Street Director (2011), indicates “there www.techdirections.com GRAPHIC ARTS/COMMUNICATION 19 A Peer-Reviewed Article Business Card Project Teaches Desktop Publishing Skills

Business Card Project Teaches Desktop Publishing Skills

By Edward J. Lazaros<br /> <br /> DESKTOP publishing can be taught in the technology classroom with a personal computer, page layout software like Adobe InDesign, and a color printer. Students can produce books, newsletters, pamphlets, business cards, postcards, and greeting cards with desktop publishing software.<br /> <br /> People working in the desktop publishing field generate illustrations and arrange those illustrations with text and images, making them attractive in terms of design. They use software to manipulate the size, fonts, and spacing of text. The digital files generated are typically output to a printing plate that can be used to reproduce the design in mass quantity. Short-run print jobs can also be output with a high resolution color printer.<br /> <br /> In addition to designing the layout of the pages, it is not uncommon for a desktop publisher to write and edit content in the course of work on an article or newsletter. In small companies, a desktop publisher has responsibility for a wide variety of jobs. At a large firm, he or she may only perform a specific task like page layout (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2011).<br /> <br /> Desktop publishers are often referred to by different titles depending on the specific job that they are hired to complete. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (2011), “desktop publishers also may be called publication specialists, electronic publishers, DTP operators, desktop publishing editors, electronic prepress technicians, electronic publishing specialists, image designers, and Web publication designers.”<br /> <br /> Of particular interest to students is the fact that there is generally no requirement for a specific type of education or training. However, the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests an associate or a bachelor’s degree in graphic arts, graphic communication, or graphic design.<br /> <br /> A wide range of annual salaries may be attained in this occupation. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the “median annual wages of desktop publishers were $39,040 in May 2012. The middle 50% earned between $28,140 and $47,870. The lowest 10% earned less than $21,860, and the highest 10% earned more than $59,210 a year” (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2011). The Street Director (2011), indicates “there is a huge demand for people in the desktop publishing industry.”<br /> <br /> According to Market Research (2011), “digital technologies and the Internet have changed fundamentally the way that information is shared and produced.”<br /> <br /> Activity Background<br /> In this activity, students will learn about desktop publishing through a real-world activity with community partners. The teacher will make contact with local businesses in the community where the school is located to determine whether any would like to have students design a new business card for the business. Groups of students will be assigned the task of designing a business card for each company identified by the teacher. Students will use page layout software (Adobe InDesign) to design the business card.<br /> <br /> Objectives<br /> 1. After completing the activity, students will know how to use the measurement increment, set-up, frame, dimension, direct selection, place, fitting, and type tools in Adobe InDesign to design a business card that meets with the design preferences of the community partner.<br /> 2. Students will also know how to use a computer with Internet access to locate appropriate images for use on the business card.<br /> <br /> Teacher Procedure<br /> 1. Contact local businesses to determine whether any are interested in having students design a new business card for the business.<br /> 2. Request that each business provide their contact information, design preferences for their business card, and one of their current business cards.<br /> 3. Assign students a specific company for whom they will design a new business card.<br /> 4. Show an example of a business card from the local business that they wish to have redesigned. (See Photo 1.)<br /> 5. Share with students information and sample business card from each company so that the students can become familiar with the company contact information and design preferences.<br /> 6. Ask students to brainstorm ideas for the business card, giving consideration to color, background imagery, font styles, and so forth.<br /> 7. Demonstrate how to search for images that could be used as a background for the business card using Google. (See Photo 2.)<br /> <br /> Student Procedure<br /> 1. After doing an Internet search using Google, select an image for the background of the business card and download it to the computer for later use. (See Photo 3.)<br /> 2. Open the page layout software (Adobe InDesign) and in it open a new blank document. Use the mouse to right click on the ruler on the top and along the left side of the screen and change the measurement increments from the default setting of picas to inches. (See Fig. 1.)<br /> <br /> (Throughout this project, where the instructions say to "right click," Macintosh users should press the control key when they click.)<br /> <br /> 3. Set up the bleed area frame for the business card. (See Photo 4.) The bleed area is the outermost frame of the card. The background image or colored background will bleed beyond the edges of the card to ensure a full bleed even if trim cuts are not precise. Start by clicking on the frame tool along the left side of the screen and then click on the blank page. A dimension window will appear. Enter the bleed dimensions for the business card, 3.75" 2.25", in this window. Select OK. (See Fig. 2.)<br /> 4. Set up the “no type” area frame for the business card. The no type area is the middle frame of the card. It is the zone where the designer must refrain from including text or graphics. If the designer leaves content out of the no type area, a buffer will exist between the content and the cut edge. Click on the frame tool and then click on the blank page. A dimension window will appear. Enter the no type area dimensions, 3.50"

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