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techdirections March 2014 : Page 26

A Tech Directions Classic Baseball Equipment Rack Project By Richard Johnson S TUDENTS can build this sports rack to hold their baseball equipment. The proj-ect teaches a variety of construction techniques plus face-to-face and edge-to-edge build-up sequences. If used as a hand woodworking project, the teacher will have to joint the edges of the back pieces for edge-to-edge build-up. The equipment rack can be built in a variety of sizes: the 7" size will hold one ball, one bat, and one glove or hat; a 14" rack holds twice as much; and an 18" rack holds one more bat. The size can be increased to hold all the balls and bats of your softball team. Before starting, students should mea sure the neck sizes of their bats—neck diameters will vary from softball to base-ball bats and with metal bats or wooden bats. To determine the width of the bat neck slots, have students cut a variety of slots in a piece of card board. The project plans include two types of checkpoints: I ____, &#1a; the instructor’s checkpoint to keep This article first appeared in the May 1983 issue of this magazine. At that time, Richard Johnson was an industrial arts instructor. Perry Tipler Middle School, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. on top of the student’s progress, and  the student procedure check to ____, emphasize the need to follow direc-tions. The checkpoint system requires less instructor time because the stu-dents actually follow directions. Fig. 1 —Construction details Qty. 2 2 Qty. 1 1 2 Bill of Materials Name T @ W @ L (rough size) Back pcs. 4/4 @ 4-1/2 @ 8 or 15 or 19 Support pcs. 3/4 @ 4 @ 8 or 15 or 19 Name Back Support Dowels T @ W @ L (actual size) 3/4 @ 8 @ 7 or 14 or 18 1-1/2 @ 3-1/2 @ 7 or 14 or 18 1/2 dia @ 2 26 tech directions X MARCH 2014

Baseball Equipment Rack Project

Richard Johnson


STUDENTS can build this sports rack to hold their baseball equipment. The project teaches a variety of construction techniques plus face-to-face and edge-to-edge build-up sequences. If used as a hand woodworking project, the teacher will have to joint the edges of the back pieces for edge-to-edge build-up.

The equipment rack can be built in a variety of sizes: the 7" size will hold one ball, one bat, and one glove or hat; a 14" rack holds twice as much; and an 18" rack holds one more bat. The size can be increased to hold all the balls and bats of your softball team.

Before starting, students should measure the neck sizes of their bats—neck diameters will vary from softball to baseball bats and with metal bats or wooden bats. To determine the width of the bat neck slots, have students cut a variety of slots in a piece of card board.

The project plans include two types of checkpoints: I____, the instructor’s checkpoint to keep on top of the student’s progress, and ____, the student procedure check to emphasize the need to follow directions. The checkpoint system requires less instructor time because the students actually follow directions.

Bill of Materials
Qty. Name T x W x L (rough size)
2 Back pcs. 4/4 x 4-1/2 x 8 or 15 or 19
2 Support pcs. 3/4 x 4 x 8 or 15 or 19

Qty. Name T x W x L (actual size)
1 Back 3/4 x 8 x 7 or 14 or 18
1 Support 1-1/2 x 3-1/2 x 7 or 14 or 18
2 Dowels 1/2 dia x 2

Project Plans—Baseball Equipment Rack
Upon completion of each step with an I____ before it, have the instructor check off the step. Upon completion of each numbered procedure step, check off the step.

I____ Obtain instructor’s approval
____ Student check upon completion
____ 1. Check bill of materials and lay out stock to rough dimensions.
a. Back pieces from rough lumber.
b. Support pieces from 3/4" lumber.

I____ 2. Cut out all pieces to rough dimensions.

Back
____ 1. Plane one edge of both back pieces. Instructor may have to joint on jointer.
____ 2. Build-up (glue edge to edge) two rough pieces.
I____ 3. Complete instructional package on surface planer. Take safety test and machine demon stration.
____ 4. Plane stock to 3/4" thickness.
____ 5. Square up back to actual size.

a. Square better edge—jack plane.
b. Square better end—jack plane.
c. Lay out length—framing square.
d. Square to length— plane or miter box saw.
e. Lay out width—2' steel rule.
f. Plane to width—jack plane.

I____ 6. Trace pattern on top edge.
____ 7. Cut out pattern—jigsaw.
____ 8. Sand pattern on disc and drum sander.
I____ 9. Lay out position of 3/16" hanging holes and 1 /2 " dowel rod holes.
____ 10. Drill 3/16" hanging holes.
____ 11. Drill 1/2" dowel rod holes at 5° angle.
____ 12. Sand all exposed surfaces.

Support pieces
____ 1. Square one edge of both support pieces—jack plane.
I____ 2. Lay out position of all holes on top of support board (Fig. 1).
____ 3. Bore 2" dia outside holes in top board with fly cutter.
I____ 4. Glue two support pieces together carefully.
a. Squared edges must line up evenly (flush).
b. Wipe excess glue from hole areas.

I____ 5. Square up support piece.
a. Locate center of support piece and measure 1 /2 of the length to the right and left of center. Draw length lines with try square.
b. Crosscut better end—miter box saw.
c. Crosscut to length—miter box saw.
d. Lay out width—2' steel rule.
e. Plane to width—jack plane.

____ 6. Drill 1-1/2" dia bat hanging holes.
I____ 7. Lay out 1-1/8" to 1-1/4" bat neck slots with try square and 1 /2" radius with 1" dia circle template (Fig. 1).
____ 8. Cut out slots and 1 /2" radii on jigsaw. Cut inside slot lines.

Empty equipment rack
I____ 9. Hand file and disc sand slots and curves to pattern line.
I____ 10. Complete instructional package on router. Take safety test and machine demonstration.
____ 11. Rout top outside edge with round-over bit with pilot tip. Do not rout back squared edge.
____ 12. Sand all exposed surfaces. Do not sand squared back edge of support.

Assembly
I____ 1. Locate wood screw hole position on back of back piece—4-3/4" down from top patterned edge. Lay out center line down middle of back edge of support piece. Wood screws must be placed between bat hanging slots and ball storage holes (Fig. 1).
____ 2. Drill 5/64" pilot holes in back edge of sup port piece.
____ 3. Drill 11/64" shank holes in back of back and countersink for #8 flat head wood screw.
____ 4. Assemble with a small amount of glue and 1-1/2" #8 flat head wood screws.
____ 5. Sand end grain of support and back flush on disc sander.
____ 6. Touch up sand all exposed surfaces.
____ 7. Cut 1/2" dowel rods to length.
____ 8. File one end of dowel rod round and sand smooth.
____ 9. Glue two dowel rods in holes on back. Apply glue in holes with scrap piece 1/4" dowel rod.
____ 10. Apply three coats of finish, sanding between coats with wet and dry abrasive (360 grit).
____ 11. Glue felt in base and sides of ball storage holes and back of bat hanging holes.
I____ 12. Have instructor grade project.

This article first appeared in the May 1983 issue of this magazine. At that time, Richard Johnson was an industrial arts instructor. Perry Tipler Middle School, Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

Read the full article at http://www.omagdigital.com/article/Baseball+Equipment+Rack+Project/1642281/198323/article.html.

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