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techdirections February 2017 : Page 19

How Did My Spark Get Started? By Ian Jansen I WISH I knew the exact moment, but I think my spark for the trade has been with me my entire life. It was only a few years ago when my class took a trip to several schools in the Tri-Star school network that made the spark wax stron-ger and brighter. The program I felt drawn to the most was welding. However, it was not until my sophomore year, where I had the opportunity to go to a Tri-Star program, when that spark started to burn brighter and hotter. I think the potential and the desire has always been within me. My dad was a metalworker, a machinist, and a mechanic, and he could also weld. The reasons for me to select welding for a career though are vastly different. I feel as if I have found a skill that I know I can always con-tinue to learn. I feel that welding is an art that few can do, but those few make the world we live in possible. Everything that I see and use in my everyday life depends on welding, in one way or another. Also, I have always had a love of science. Welding is an industrial process that combines the hands-on aspect that I crave with the science that has always inspired me to create and experiment with different scientific principles on various materials. With the scientific aspect, I know that my appetite for the sciences will be continuously filled with knowledge of different metals and their atomic structure. I will also learn how to manipulate and work the different metals into any shape in the world. With the knowledge of the different metals and the skills to work them, I know that I will one day be able to make the world that I live in better in some big ways, but also in some little ways. My career goals are a little wild because of my imagination. However, my ideal goal would be to be able to weld exotic met-als like titanium and Inconel. The reason for this is because I could one day potentially weld on the next generation of space craft that would go to other worlds and explore space. I have always been curious of what lies beyond our solar system, and what different kinds of elements and alien worlds, planets, and solar systems there might be. In order to do all of this my, hope-fully, future employer, would be NASA. Ever since I was little I have always been obsessed with flying, animals, and machines. I say that the reason for my obses-sion has to deal with my father, who built and flew model airplanes. I feel that my dad supports me in my choice to become a welder. Ian Jansen was a student at Hobart Institute of Welding Tech-nology when he wrote this article. He graduated in November 2016 and is currently working as a welder at Industrial Machin-ing Services, Fort Loramie, OH. Reprinted from Spring 2016 Is-sue, World of Welding magazine, Approved by Hobart Institute of Welding Technology. www.techdirections.com WELDING 19

How Did My Spark Get Started?

Ian Jansen

I WISH I knew the exact moment, but I think my spark for the trade has been with me my entire life. It was only a few years ago when my class took a trip to several schools in the Tri-Star school network that made the spark wax stronger and brighter. The program I felt drawn to the most was welding. However, it was not until my sophomore year, where I had the opportunity to go to a Tri-Star program, when that spark started to burn brighter and hotter.

I think the potential and the desire has always been within me. My dad was a metalworker, a machinist, and a mechanic, and he could also weld. The reasons for me to select welding for a career though are vastly different.

I feel as if I have found a skill that I know I can always continue to learn. I feel that welding is an art that few can do, but those few make the world we live in possible. Everything that I see and use in my everyday life depends on welding, in one way or another.

Also, I have always had a love of science. Welding is an industrial process that combines the hands-on aspect that I crave with the science that has always inspired me to create and experiment with different scientific principles on various materials. With the scientific aspect, I know that my appetite for the sciences will be continuously filled with knowledge of different metals and their atomic structure. I will also learn how to manipulate and work the different metals into any shape in the world. With the knowledge of the different metals and the skills to work them, I know that I will one day be able to make the world that I live in better in some big ways, but also in some little ways.

My career goals are a little wild because of my imagination. However, my ideal goal would be to be able to weld exotic metals like titanium and Inconel. The reason for this is because I could one day potentially weld on the next generation of space craft that would go to other worlds and explore space. I have always been curious of what lies beyond our solar system, and what different kinds of elements and alien worlds, planets, and solar systems there might be. In order to do all of this my, hopefully, future employer, would be NASA. Ever since I was little I have always been obsessed with flying, animals, and machines. I say that the reason for my obsession has to deal with my father, who built and flew model airplanes. I feel that my dad supports me in my choice to become a welder.

Ian Jansen was a student at Hobart Institute of Welding Technology when he wrote this article. He graduated in November 2016 and is currently working as a welder at Industrial Machining Services, Fort Loramie, OH. Reprinted from Spring 2016 Issue, World of Welding magazine, Approved by Hobart Institute of Welding Technology.

Read the full article at http://www.omagdigital.com/article/How+Did+My+Spark+Get+Started%3F/2702160/380947/article.html.

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