Industrial Fire World Spring 2011 : Page 17

the left of the wand, the area to the right of the wand, the center of the tank, and the area directly below the wand. Each wand head provides balanced foam attacks left and right of the wand with foam running away from the wand and along the tank wall. The upper stream discharges foam at a slight upward angle toward the center of the tank. Another stream discharges foam from the wand head back against the tank’s shell, protecting the area below the unit. As Ambush units combine around the perimeter, the collective center-aimed streams attack the central fire area of the tank. Simultaneously, the left and right streams propel foam along the perimeter of the tank, extinguishing fire in its path. As the wand applications meet adjoining wand applications, the foam blanket begins to converge toward the center of the tank where it meets the FootPrint® spreading from the center. The combined effect creates a full-surface foam blanket. The above systems which make up the Tank Battalion Series will revolutionize storage tank fire fighting. As with any foam systems, the systems should be maintained and the proper foam concentrate used. Results differ with different types and manufacturers’ foam concentrate. Facilities should use the most effective and efficient foam concentrates for their systems. It should be noted that the Tank Battalion System components have patent pending and have been submitted for Underwriters Laboratories (UL) listing. Discussions with major oil companies have received favorable results, with managers stating that they would use these systems in place of foam chambers because of the reduced maintenance costs, efficiency of the systems and increased safety to operating personnel. For further information, please contact the authors or Williams F&HC direct at www.williamsfire.com. C Authors Chief Craig H. Shelley (ret.) Chief Shelley is a 40-year veteran of the fire service. He served with the Fire Department of New York for 26 years retiring as the chief of marine operations. Craig was also the chief of the city of Rutland (VT) Fire Department as well as serving as a fire orotection advisor for Saudi Aramco. Chief Shelley served for seven years on the National Fire Protection Association’s Technical Committee on Training. He has performed petroleum industry and marine consulting throughout the world, most recently for a major oil company in Libya where a comprehensive analysis of process, storage and marine facilities was conducted. Currently, Shelley is the CEO of World Safe International, LLC and a member of the Williams Fire and Hazard Control team. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Fire Service Administration and a Master of Science degree in Executive Fire Service Leadership. craig.shelley@worldsafeinternational.com Battalion Chief Sue Tarantino Chief Tarantino is a 26-year veteran of the Charlotte (NC) Fire Department. She has served as a battalion chief for 11 years, during which time she supervised the operations of the hazardous materials company. In her current capacity, she oversees the pre-incident response planning and response to numerous petroleum storage tank facilities within the battalion’s response district. She also served as the chairperson for the department’s Health and Wellness Committee and drafted the CFD’s respiratory protection program. Chief Tarantino is an instructor in advanced strategy and tactics at Central Piedmont Community College as well as Command and Control with the Office of the State Fire Marshal. She currently is a senior fire protection specialist with World Safe International, LLC. Tarantino holds an Associate degree in Fire Protection Technology, a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Psychology and a Master of Business Administration. starantino@worldsafeinternational.com 1 Webster’s New World Dictionary, Third College Edition (1991). New York: Simon and Schuster. 2 A Type III discharge outlet is a device that delivers foam so that it falls directly onto the surface of the burning liquid in a manner that causes general agitation; for example, lobbing with a foam nozzle. (American Petroleum Institute [API] 2021, Fighting Fires in and Around Flammable and Combustible Liquid Atmospheric Storage Tanks) 3 A Type II discharge outlet is a device that delivers foam onto the burning liquid, partially submerges the foam, and produces restricted agitation of the surface; for example a foam chamber. (API 2021) 4 NFPA 11, Standard for Low, Medium, and High-Expansion Foam 2010ed, A.5.2.5.2.1. Quincy, MA: NFPA 5 NFPA 11, Standard for Low, Medium, and High-Expansion Foam 2010ed, Table 5.2.6.2.8. Quincy, MA: NFPA Tyco issues CO 2 system discharge warning bulletin issued by Tyco Fire Suppression & Building Products warns that isolated reports have been re-ceived involving ANSUL High Pressure CO 2 Systems inad-vertently discharging. “We have discovered that an internal pressure vent on the cylinder valve may not be adequately venting pressure and, under certain conditions, this may cause a cylinder in the system to actuate without the sounding of an alarm, which would then cause all cylinders on this specific sys-tem to actuate,” the bulletin states. TFS&BP has determined through internal testing that high pressure CO 2 valves with a date code range of 10-07 to 06-08 may be affected. These valves were sold by TFS&BP from March 2007 through July 2009. Action recommended by TFS&BP for systems installed after March 2007 call for a qualified technician to take the following actions. • Identify the valve date code and complete the Pneu-matic Actuation Port Plug Replacement Procedure. A total number of affected valves and their locations should be provided to TFS&BP. • At the next service/maintenance cycle, the CV-98 valve should be replaced. Visit HPCO2@tycoint.com to request CV-98 vent plugs, Part No. 437612. C A SPRING 2011 17

Tyco Issues CO 2 System Discharge Warning

A bulletin issued by Tyco Fire Suppression & Building Products warns that isolated reports have been received involving ANSUL High Pressure CO 2 Systems inadvertently discharging.<br /> <br /> “We have discovered that an internal pressure vent on the cylinder valve may not be adequately venting pressure and, under certain conditions, this may cause a cylinder in the system to actuate without the sounding of an alarm, which would then cause all cylinders on this specific system to actuate,” the bulletin states.<br /> <br /> TFS&BP has determined through internal testing that high pressure CO 2 valves with a date code range of 10-07 to 06-08 may be affected. These valves were sold by TFS&BP from March 2007 through July 2009.<br /> <br /> Action recommended by TFS&BP for systems installed after March 2007 call for a qualified technician to take the following actions.<br /> <br /> • Identify the valve date code and complete the Pneumatic Actuation Port Plug Replacement Procedure. A total number of affected valves and their locations should be provided to TFS&BP.<br /> <br /> • At the next service/maintenance cycle, the CV-98 valve should be replaced. Visit HPCO2@tycoint.com to request CV-98 vent plugs, Part No. 437612.

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
 

Loading