Disc Golfer Winter 2012 : Page 64

By Kimbodia Knecht Monarch Maidens Touch Down in Sacramento Beginning at the 2011 Pro Worlds in Santa Cruz, I have sit and watch that often, so it was a nice change.” Rather than been on a mission to involve more women in disc golf. I wanted sitting and watching, the guys were included in the last con-to start a league where everyone felt included. I did not want it test, the Ring of Fire, where men, women, kids, caddies, and to be exclusive to women, necessarily, but inclusive of women casual players came over to jump putt their way to the prize. Sunday morning we played Santa Anita, our local youth from various towns and clubs as well as guys who want to help. Here in California monarch butterfl ies travel down the coast course. I wanted the women to taste the ace and feel what it’s to Santa Cruz, so in celebration of that event, the Ladies Disc like to circle twos on their cards. I also wanted to create some excitement watching the leader card and chase cards, so I sent Golf Club presented the Monarch Migration October 22-23. the groups out with tee times. Intermediate women teed I wanted to encourage our active women players and off fi rst and within two holes Colleen Wood, of Som-help build their confi dence in hopes that they might erset, hit an ace! The gallery clapped and cheered be prompted to enter PDGA events. I charged a low as they anticipated their own chances at an ace, fee and worked with six local clubs, as well as 18 local businesses for sponsorship, many of whom ‘Tournament directors too. As the women fi nished their rounds, they gathered to watch some spectacular play from sponsored a hole at Shady Oaks. I wanted each are a special species, the Open leaders. woman to feel like a winner the moment she like butterfl ies For the fi nal round, we drove over to registered. Though the fees were low, the we fl ock to John Mackey Disc Golf Park in Sacramento, players package was huge, and included a Go a nine hole course that we played twice to Girl Energy Drink, a butterfl y stamped disc, excitement.’ complete the 27 holes per day. With a higher tea, and all sorts of smaller items. —Kimbodia Knecht level of diffi culty and a second opportunity on Saturday the women met at Shady Oaks each hole, this course served to separate the Disc Golf Park in Orangevale, California. All Winners fi eld. Wearing our club T-shirts, it was appar-baskets were placed in short positions and Open Women: Dawn Lenhart ent that women make disc golf look good. each was sponsored with $50 for an ace. This Advanced Women: Sarah Amaya Once the scorecards came in, we cel-helped to fi ll my Open division, as all the big-Intermediate Women: Colleen Wood ebrated with dinner, awards, and a raffl e at a arm drivers came out to “Drive for Dough.” Junior Girls: Julia Hillman local restaurant, El Papagayo, a family-owned With experienced Open women in the fi eld, restaurant that hosted our players and play-I was able to mix the groups on the fi rst day, each with at least one player from each division, so that novice ers’ families, and which generously donated a percent of its players could learn the proper rules and etiquette. Sadly, no proceeds to the Ladies Disc Golf Club of Sacramento. I am $50 aces were hit. We did, however, have one $50 ace revert grateful to have found such a wonderful business that wanted to a CTP on hole 12, which was won by Sarah Amaya of San to support disc golf, and I encourage you to establish such relationships in your own community. As the evening ended Francisco Disc Golf Club. While the women played their early morning game, just with many hugs and thanks, I realized that I had created an across town the men were setting up temporary baskets in intersection between great women, excellent disc golf clubs, place of poles at Carmichael Park. Though the guys came out and supportive businesses. The fi rst annual Monarch Migration presented more than to play a smaller side tournament, which added funds to the women’s purse, many of them were helpful in fl agging teepads, 20 trophies and prizes distributed among all divisions. These marking OB lines, and caddying for the women. The men were beautiful butterfl y trophies were funded in part by the silent auction, which featured three framed/signed discs, a handmade also helpful with rules and felt included. Immediately after the 27 holes, the Ladies Disc Golf Club champion quilt, and a pair of Bite disc golf shoes. Thanks to hosted a variety of contests. The putting contest came fi rst. all of our sponsors, all divisions also received cash payouts and prizes. Capturing the signifi cance of this event, Colleen Each player had two chances to make a basket. If she did, Wood remarked, “The ladies tournament was an awesome she continued to the next station. Lacy Soltau Robinson event. To see women from all over the state, including putted through a half-dozen stations to a trophy vic-Nevada, shows that women are a force to be reckoned tory of 36 feet and 7 inches. She also won the Long with! Thanks to all who came out. We Arm Contest by throwing her 169-gram Mon-hope to see you next October for the arch 252 feet and 9 inches. The last contest second annual Monarch Migration.” was for CTP among the ladies. With a basket set up at 100 feet, our junior girls seemed to have the ad-vantage, wowing the crowd with near chain misses. The CTP trophy winner was Naddy —Kimbodia Knecht at a mere 20.5 inches. Carmichael #48129 is a fi rst-grade teacher course designer Michael Guerrero com-who enjoys playing and promoting disc mented, “We men really enjoyed watching the golf clubs. She is currently writing her women tear up the courses. The putting, driv-second children’s book, which will feature ing, and CTPs were also cool. We don’t get to disc golf, etiquette, and rules. 64

19TH HOLE

Kimbodia Knecht

<br /> Monarch Maidens Touch Down in Sacramento<br /> <br /> Beginning at the 2011 Pro Worlds in Santa Cruz, I have been on a mission to involve more women in disc golf. I wanted to start a league where everyone felt included. I did not want it to be exclusive to women, necessarily, but inclusive of women from various towns and clubs as well as guys who want to help.<br /> <br /> Here in California monarch butterflies travel down the coast to Santa Cruz, so in celebration of that event, the Ladies Disc Golf Club presented the Monarch Migration October 22-23.<br /> <br /> I wanted to encourage our active women players and help build their confidence in hopes that they might be prompted to enter PDGA events. I charged a low fee and worked with six local clubs, as well as 18 local businesses for sponsorship, many of whom sponsored a hole at Shady Oaks. I wanted each woman to feel like a winner the moment she registered. Though the fees were low, the players package was huge, and included a Go Girl Energy Drink, a butterfly stamped disc, tea, and all sorts of smaller items.<br /> <br /> Saturday the women met at Shady Oaks Disc Golf Park in Orangevale, California. All baskets were placed in short positions and each was sponsored with $50 for an ace. This helped to fill my Open division, as all the bigarm drivers came out to “Drive for Dough.” With experienced Open women in the field, I was able to mix the groups on the first day, each with at least one player from each division, so that novice players could learn the proper rules and etiquette. Sadly, no $50 aces were hit. We did, however, have one $50 ace revert to a CTP on hole 12, which was won by Sarah Amaya of San Francisco Disc Golf Club.<br /> <br /> While the women played their early morning game, just across town the men were setting up temporary baskets in place of poles at Carmichael Park. Though the guys came out to play a smaller side tournament, which added funds to the women’s purse, many of them were helpful in flagging teepads, marking OB lines, and caddying for the women. The men were also helpful with rules and felt included.<br /> <br /> Immediately after the 27 holes, the Ladies Disc Golf Club hosted a variety of contests. The putting contest came first. Each player had two chances to make a basket. If she did, she continued to the next station. Lacy Soltau Robinson putted through a half-dozen stations to a trophy victory of 36 feet and 7 inches. She also won the Long Arm Contest by throwing her 169-gram Monarch 252 feet and 9 inches. The last contest was for CTP among the ladies. With a basket set up at 100 feet, our junior girls seemed to have the advantage, wowing the crowd with near chain misses. The CTP trophy winner was Naddy at a mere 20.5 inches. Carmichael course designer Michael Guerrero commented, “We men really enjoyed watching the women tear up the courses. The putting, driving, and CTPs were also cool. We don’t get to sit and watch that often, so it was a nice change.” Rather than sitting and watching, the guys were included in the last contest, the Ring of Fire, where men, women, kids, caddies, and casual players came over to jump putt their way to the prize.<br /> <br /> Sunday morning we played Santa Anita, our local youth course. I wanted the women to taste the ace and feel what it’s like to circle twos on their cards. I also wanted to create some excitement watching the leader card and chase cards, so I sent the groups out with tee times. Intermediate women teed off first and within two holes Colleen Wood, of Somerset, hit an ace! The gallery clapped and cheered as they anticipated their own chances at an ace, too. As the women finished their rounds, they gathered to watch some spectacular play from the Open leaders.<br /> <br /> For the final round, we drove over to John Mackey Disc Golf Park in Sacramento, a nine hole course that we played twice to complete the 27 holes per day. With a higher level of difficulty and a second opportunity on each hole, this course served to separate the field. Wearing our club T-shirts, it was apparent that women make disc golf look good.<br /> <br /> Once the scorecards came in, we celebrated with dinner, awards, and a raffle at a local restaurant, El Papagayo, a family-owned restaurant that hosted our players and players’ families, and which generously donated a percent of its proceeds to the Ladies Disc Golf Club of Sacramento. I am grateful to have found such a wonderful business that wanted to support disc golf, and I encourage you to establish such relationships in your own community. As the evening ended with many hugs and thanks, I realized that I had created an intersection between great women, excellent disc golf clubs, and supportive businesses.<br /> <br /> The first annual Monarch Migration presented more than 20 trophies and prizes distributed among all divisions. These beautiful butterfly trophies were funded in part by the silent auction, which featured three framed/signed discs, a handmade champion quilt, and a pair of Bite disc golf shoes. Thanks to all of our sponsors, all divisions also received cash payouts and prizes. Capturing the significance of this event, Colleen Wood remarked, “The ladies tournament was an awesome event. To see women from all over the state, including Nevada, shows that women are a force to be reckoned with! Thanks to all who came out. We hope to see you next October for the second annual Monarch Migration.”

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